The Parent’s Role

  • Do not coach the team players, including your own youngster, from the sidelines during the game.

  • Respect the judgment of the referee and do not criticize officials. (Only those persons who get a 97% or above on the yearly referee test may yell at the referee; only those with an IQ of less than 25 may yell at the coach.) You may have the belief that your opinions are ( 1) accurate, (2) incisive, and (3) worthy of communicating loudly so everyone else can hear them. However, that is wrong and the referees are not going to make any changes in response to your bellows from the sideline. We are making a valiant effort to have our players learn to respect authority. BE A ROLE MODEL!

  • Supportive parents focus on mastering soccer skills and game strategies.

  • Believe that soccer's primary value is to provide youth an opportunity for self-development.

  • Soccer games are full of mistakes, and the team that makes fewer mistakes generally wins the game. They are still our kids — professionals! Even the pros make mistakes, but pros are paid to be able to take the criticism and know that it is aimed at their play rather than themselves as persons. Kids goof, Refs goof and Coaches goof- let's deal with and learn from the mistakes. Comments directed to players especially to the other team need to be positive!

  • Communicate with the coach and create a positive, supportive working relationship.

  • Understand and respect the different roles of parents and coaches. (You do not need to kneel in the presence of the coach; a curtsey or slight bow is all that is necessary.)

  • Control negative emotions and think positively.

  • Avoid the use of fear-player development is rarely fostered by fear of the consequence of failure. Players who have fun continue to play. Keeping players interested in soccer in a great way to keep them busy.

  • Realize that this is still a game. Despite the fact the each player's family has invested time and money in soccer, and are hoping that soccer will help pay the college bills, it is just a game. If your child doesn't enjoy it, they will not play well — and maybe not play at all. Ask yourself if what you do at games, practices and tournaments helps your kid have fun and enjoy the game or adds pressure and worry. Ask yourself after the game if watching two teams of beautiful, talented, fit and eager young children was fun for you? If is wasn't — if you found yourself criticizing, carping, upset and unhappy — remember that there is enough pressure and stress involved with making a living and guiding your family through the challenges of modern life. Forget the calls, forget the score and forget the standings. Give your kid a hug and tell them that you love them and be thankful for every day you have to share with them because they don't stay kids very long.

  • Help when asked. The league is making an effort to provide the highest quality of soccer for your player. The coaches are volunteering to help your player be a better player. The league is helping by running clinics and assisting coaches. The league will ask you to help on occasion. The concession stand is a safety issue as it provides water etc to players. It also helps keep the cost of the program down. It is a sad site when the only volunteer to man the stand during your allotted time is the coach and/or team mom.